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Mark Dujsik
01-20-2003, 10:36 PM
"Who would have thought that a story that handles such concepts as womenís issues, faded love, suicide, and literary consciousness and variation and weaves and connects them through the individual tales of three different women from three different eras would be so uninvolving? Iím not being sarcastic either. The opening minutes of The Hours are intensely promising, documenting the sad demise of one of its central characters and then intercutting the introductions of the three central heroines with relative fluidity. Then each of the womenís stories begins to take focus, and the connection between them starts to fall apart. Thematically, I suppose they always remain related, although as the movie progresses, the themes start to falter due to underdevelopment and overemphasis. Dramatically, though, the stories donít mesh. In some ways, The Hours is no better than most of the so-called "chick flicks" that have been released in recent years, thanks to unconvincing character and situation development. It has a self-importance to it, though, because of its literary roots and prestigious cast. In some ways, those elements save it from becoming a total failure and raise it to something entirely mediocre."

Mark's Full Review (http://mark-reviews-movies.tripod.com/reviews/H/hours.htm)

Mark Dujsik
01-20-2003, 10:37 PM
After some of the reaction to my favorable but not gushing reaction to The Pianist, I'm worried about the potential responses to this one.

Please say some people agree with me on this.

oscar jubis
01-21-2003, 01:11 AM
My problem with your informative, well-written reviews of Pianist and Hours is that your analysis of themes and ideas is a bit shallow at times. When you say that the third story in The Hours is "useless", you fail to see how this adaptation (in the current post-modernist style) of the novel being written by Mrs. Woolf is a cleverly used conceit. It transports her preoccupations, such as the struggle for a life of consequence, to the 21st century and shows them to be timeless. The third story brings into focus the lasting impact of literature, and by extension, art. Additionally, this segment explores issues of personal guilt and duty to others. The presentation of these themes is not blunt and obvious, like in Lee's and Stone's films. The rest of the film is also rich in unexplored meaning. However, The Hours is not entirely successful and will disappoint those expecting a Woolf biopic. The Virginia Woolf we see here is rather overly defined by her mental illness, and not sufficiently by her wit and genius. There are no attempts to define her as a writer with a particular style. At times, I felt Ms. Kidman's performance was a perfect one note. The Hours is not a masterpiece but it is a must see.
By the way, isn't a little, friendly disagreement more fun?

Mark Dujsik
01-21-2003, 01:16 AM
Originally posted by oscar jubis
My problem with your informative, well-written reviews of Pianist and Hours is that your analysis of themes and ideas is a bit shallow at times. When you say that the third story in The Hours is "useless", you fail to see how this adaptation (in the current post-modernist style) of the novel being written by Mrs. Woolf is a cleverly used conceit. It transports her preoccupations, such as the struggle for a life of consequence, to the 21st century and shows them to be timeless. The third story brings into focus the lasting impact of literature, and by extension, art. Additionally, this segment explores issues of personal guilt and duty to others. The presentation of these themes is not blunt and obvious, like in Lee's and Stone's films. The rest of the film is also rich in unexplored meaning. However, The Hours is not entirely successful and will disappoint those expecting a Woolf biopic. The Virginia Woolf we see here is rather overly defined by her mental illness, and not sufficiently by her wit and genius. There are no attempts to define her as a writer with a particular style. At times, I felt Ms. Kidman's performance was a perfect one note. The Hours is not a masterpiece but it is a must see.
By the way, isn't a little, friendly disagreement more fun?

Personally, I felt the third segment was overdone and overwrought, in an attempt hide the fact that there is no depth beyond the post-modern connection to Woolf's work (at least in the movie; I haven't read the novel). Really thought it dragged down the other two sections.

And, yes, it is. :)

tabuno
02-01-2003, 10:36 PM
It's interesting to see how smart and intelligent people just can't enjoy a good movie or perhaps they are too smart for themselves while the rest of us average folk can at least bask in the delicious acting, fascinating intercutting that enfolds compellingly and in interesting ways. The Hours, with Ed Harris' performance along with his brilliant portrayal of Jack Pollock two years ago, contributes to a strong statement for lesbian women and an uplifting message of feminine strength for our times. I applaud the effort and think it richly deserves the acting and editing awards that this drama movie has and will likely receive. It is well acted, it made sense, the overlapping plots having just the right touch (rather than the enmeshment that some critics would prefer). I had been worried that this movie would be just a bunch of morbid women overburdened with depression without much redeeming value, but this movie revealed a strength of female spirit and the unforunate men would couldn't understand them. In the end Ed Harris really liberates himself and his inspiration for life in an act of maturity. John C. Reilly demonstrates his breakthrough onto the big screen in this movie and Chicago. Sometimes when you know it all, movies just seem to lose all meaning and beauty. The simple story told well. The basic emotions acted well. A bird's grave and lying to behold its meaning. My mother loved it and that says a lot to me.

Mark Dujsik
02-02-2003, 12:22 AM
Originally posted by tabuno
My mother loved it and that says a lot to me.

Mine enjoyed it as well, but she definitely understood where I was coming from with my reaction to it.


It's interesting to see how smart and intelligent people just can't enjoy a good movie or perhaps they are too smart for themselves while the rest of us average folk can at least bask in the delicious acting, fascinating intercutting that enfolds compellingly and in interesting ways.

Wait, I didn't enjoy it. So that means you think I'm smart and intelligent? Ha ha! Joke's on you!

:)

oscar jubis
02-02-2003, 06:26 AM
I think this film will win the Oscar for best picture. It has a socially progressive agenda but it's tame and tasteful enough for Mom. Now, to be honest, this thread is getting a bit too Freudian for me.

tabuno
02-02-2003, 11:10 AM
I'll let the post subject speak for itself, espcially for those smart people.

Mark Dujsik
02-02-2003, 12:05 PM
Originally posted by oscar jubis
I think this film will win the Oscar for best picture. It has a socially progressive agenda but it's tame and tasteful enough for Mom. Now, to be honest, this thread is getting a bit too Freudian for me.

I agree about the Oscar.

Let's all watch A.I. again.

oscar jubis
02-02-2003, 07:28 PM
Is a C.S.W. equivalent to L.C.S.W.? Those letters follow my last name here in the East, colleague. I'm not sure I understand who you mean by "smart people"(probably not me uh). Is it a polite way to say Mark D is fastidious?
I'm curious about your opinion. Comment from a colleague:
Social workers particularly appreciate films that bring attention to an injustice and films that mean to teach, inspire and promote understanding.
My comment: What is most unfortunate about last year's best picture Oscar winner is the lost opportunities to portray mental illness accurately and to deal with the real life complexities of this man's marriage(and divorce and remarriage) and sexual orientation. As a mental health professional, I was disappointed by the condescending,simplistic portrayal and totally disgusted with all the highfalutin, masturbatory speeches by the principals during and after the ceremony. I see worse movies at least once per month, but none tick me off like A Beautiful Mind.
I don't seem to get tired of AI after several viewings.

Mark Dujsik
02-02-2003, 09:35 PM
Originally posted by oscar jubis
I don't seem to get tired of AI after several viewings.

Me neither. I seriously need to watch it again.

tabuno
02-02-2003, 09:54 PM
A Certified Social Worker is a L.C.S.W. minus 2,000 hours of supervised clinical practice (two to three years). The one mind-blowing element of "A Beautiful Mind" that of schizophrenia being the reality of delusion makes it sufficient to provide "A Beautiful Mind" the accolades heaped on it. Whether or not it did justice to any other manifestations of mental illness isn't as important as the singular mental twist of this movie because that is about all that most movie audiences will have the capacity to remember and appreciate for years to come.