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Thread: The Virgin Suicides-A True Masterpiece

  1. #1
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    The Virgin Suicides-A True Masterpiece

    About two weeks ago I asked my father to rent The Virgin Suicides so Joseph and I could watch it. I'd watched it when I was 10 or so and could only remember little bits and pieces. As we began to view the film, I became completely hypnotized by it. I simply could not stop watching (ok, maybe for a few seconds when Joseph and I discussed our thoughts on some scenes).
    The movie (for those of you who have not had the pleasure of watching) is about 5 boys that are infatuated with the 5 Lisbon sisters. It takes place in the suburbs of Michigan around 1975. The boys see the sisters as the most beautiful girls on the planet. One of the girls, Cecilia (13) commits suicide one night and that devastates Mr. and Mrs. Lisbon as well as the other girls. Lux Lisbon (14) is the prettiest girl in the school (other than her sisters) and every boy in school wants to be her boyfriend. Trip Fontaine (the school casanova) falls madly in love with her and asks Mr. lisbon to take her to homecoming and offers to bring along three other boys to accompany the other girls. Of course the girls are not allowed to date, but their parents make an acception for this one night. Everything seems to be going great until Trip and lux go to the football feild and fool around. Lux wakes up alone in the middle of the feild at dawn. After she abuses of her freedom, her parents take them all out of school and lock them up inside the house. They even make Lux burn all her records (a truly heartbreaking scene). The girls start to communicate with the boys through the mail and their bedroom window. To make a long story short, the boys recieve a surprise that affects them for the rest of their lives.
    Filled with gorgeous scenes of nature and the detailed lives of these sisters Sofia Coppolla completely outdid herself! not to mention the soundtrack is killer! Too, bad Joseph thought it was pure crap. He just doesn't appreciate great art. Give this a chance, it was AMAZING!

  2. #2
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    First off, welcome back to the community! It's been eons!

    Unfortunately, I'm going to have to side with Joseph on this flick. The Virgin Suicides felt empty to me. Sofia Coppola's films, so far, just lack substance. I also found the book far superior, but that's another story.
    "So I'm a heel, so what of it?"
    --Renaldo the Heel, from Crimewave

  3. #3
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    Thanks Tree! It's good to be back (and contrary to popular belief, I have not been "chasing boys", singing is another story though...right dad? ha ha ha).
    Joseph, was so glad to hear you agreed with him. I, on the other hand, do not believe that Sofia Coppola's films lack substance. You simply have to search for it. By filling the gaps with your own thoughts, or by looking at the information being put forth in a different way you come to a conclusion of your own that makes sense. They aren't the type of movies that spell it all out for you. The viewer has to be involved in the events going on in the film. The movie wasn't empty at all. Sofia allows you to see the girls from the boys point of view, and the audience is only allowed as much information on the sisters as the boys knew of them. In my opinion the fact that the characters aren't as developed as they normally would be, is what makes this film so haunting.

    written by: chelsea jubis (oops! Forgot to switch accounts!)

  4. #4
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    The Virgin Suicides, the movie, the book & the soundtrack mean a lot to me.

    I liked it a lot more than Lost In Translation.

    I can identify so well with everything in this movie. I can actually feel everything. The portraits of the girls are so well done, so extremely well done, everything, from the music they played, to their lipsticks, to the underwear on the floor and drawings on the wall. I had loved the book, and I loved how Sofia made this film. I particularly worship the scene where we see the houses and seasons changing with Air playing in the background. It's truly beautiful. There's a line, that I seem to use quite a lot, and absobloodylutely melts my heart: when the doctor asks Cecilia what is she doing there because she isn't even old enough to see how bad life gets and she answers "Obviously doctor, you've never been a thirteen yr old girl.". I think that says it all. And I love Lux's character.


    My ex-boyfriend watched the movie and hated it, he said it was vain. He, also, seems to think Sofia Coppola's movies lack substance.

    Oh I'm pretty sure they do, for some people, because they are rather particular. Not many people understand them well, especially boys, because she portrays such simple feelings, such things that feel obvious to you if you can actually relate to them, and feel completely vain if you don't.

    I have found, in certain things, one of those things being The Virgin Suicides, a very deep and hard to explain vain emptiness. It may sound strange to associate deepness and profundity with vanity, but it makes an unbelievable amount of sense to me.
    You see, especially to me, all those little things, like laying on the grass in swimwear, and writing in a diary, entries about frozen pizza for dinner and dolphins, and poems like "trees like lungs filling with air, my sister, the mean one, pulling my hair" are so quite strange, and depressing. Sometimes, it's not the great sad love stories, or great epics, or great stories about loss and death that make us cry.

    You see, it's about being a girl, it's about growing up, it's about adolescence, it's about sadness, and the world withering around us. It's not vanity, it's girlishness. I, myself, never had that much girlishness, I never wrote about frozen pizza, or dolphins. But I could so see myself in them, combing their hairs, making party invitations, painting their nails, playing beautiful old records, and wishing for a prom, and a prom dress.

    It is in all of this, all of this apparent vanity, that lies the beauty and depth of the movie, and the story itself. I think that if this was just about their relationship with their parents and the boys of the neighborhood, it would loose great part of it's appeal. It is fabulous because it reflects our youth, it reflects our behavior, and it reflects so well, how things can go wrong, how frail some of us can be sometimes.

    I loved it, because it represented a part of me, in a marvelous, lovely way.


    On the other hand, although I did enjoy LiT, it wasn't nearly as remarkable as this. It was also very pretty, but, just didn't felt the way The Virgin Suicides did.


    Note: I'm sorry for the amount of intimate chitchat on this reply.
    stay gold. x

  5. #5
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    Silverheart, you have succeeded in writing down everything I feel about this movie that I was too embarrassed to even write in my diary. 'Too much emotional stuff. Dylan will surely sneak into my diary and then share it with the entire UNIVERSE!' I thought to myself. That's why before I write anything on the movie itself, I must tell you that I completely admire the way you expressed yourself on your post. No need to appologize for the "intimate chitchat".
    Anyways, I think it's a boyfriend thing. 'Cause apparently, mines didn't like it either (as I mentioned before). That's probably because it's about being a teenage girl, growing up, and "the world withering around us". Who better to understand that than girls themselves? Plus, the soundtrack is amazing! I think that's the only part Joseph did like.

  6. #6
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    I have no problem with gap-filling; that's one of my favorite things to do. However, there comes a point when so much is left to the viewer that it lacks true meaning. Oh, and there's always something about rhyming in poems that irks me. I know that eliminates a lot, but I think that beauty in words comes differently than making things sound the same. That's a whole other story, though. Back to the task at hand!

    Sadly, I don't know what it's like to be a girl, so you can understand why I can't necessarily put myself in her shoes. But even then I just feel that this film was going beyond what it had to do; in other words, it was being artsy for the sake of being artsy. I repeat, there wasn't enough substance.
    "So I'm a heel, so what of it?"
    --Renaldo the Heel, from Crimewave

  7. #7
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    Originally posted by HorseradishTree
    But even then I just feel that this film was going beyond what it had to do; in other words, it was being artsy for the sake of being artsy. I repeat, there wasn't enough substance.
    Well see, that's exactly how I feel about The Dreamers and nobody ever seems to agree with me. I understand what you mean, and know how it feels, but not with this movie.

    xx
    stay gold. x

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