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Thread: the LAST FILM YOU'VE SEEN thread

  1. #16
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    Re: Pont du Nord, Jacques Rivette

    Originally posted by pmw
    Nice thread! Just saw Rivette's "Pond du Nord" at the Walter Reade. P
    Thanks...I believe this one played as part of the Film Comment select, didn't it? I wish I was there. Did you catch anything else?

  2. #17
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    I saw Clean! Im a huge Assayas fan and this one did not disappoint. Im sure it will be written off by audiences, because Assayas teeters on the edge of hipster-dom, but I think its a very smart line to take, and Nolte is really great. His performance alone is worth the ticket. An honest and very touching story of a mother getting on with her life (chung). How about you? See anything at Selects?
    P

  3. #18
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    Originally posted by pmw
    I saw Clean! Im a huge Assayas fan and this one did not disappoint. Im sure it will be written off by audiences, because Assayas teeters on the edge of hipster-dom, but I think its a very smart line to take, and Nolte is really great. His performance alone is worth the ticket. An honest and very touching story of a mother getting on with her life (chung). How about you? See anything at Selects?
    P
    Great...now I really can't wait (the French DVD comes out April 21st). Did see the Oscar nominated German film about Hitler called Downfall (DER UNTERGANG); it's big and bold but doesn't offer much in terms of analysis, unless one doesn't know anything. Bruno Ganz is there doing his best Depardieu and the carnage scenes rival those of Schindler's List. It should do well theatrically (it is now officially out also).

  4. #19
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    Just finished Bad Timing (A Sensual Obsession). Long unavailable here, I found a copy of a DVD from who knows where. Damn good print, and a very interesting film. If you are a fan of Nicholas Roeg, then you will love this film, if not, then beware.

  5. #20
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    Just watched Two or Three Things I Know About Her (1966). Godard at the peak of his creative power, somehow this film just didn't blow me away quite like some of his others, but still well worth your time.

  6. #21
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    Originally posted by wpqx
    Just watched Two or Three Things I Know About Her (1966). Godard at the peak of his creative power, somehow this film just didn't blow me away quite like some of his others, but still well worth your time.
    Where did you see it? on vhs?

    I'm thinking about checking out Masculine Feminine which is playing at Film Forum until Feb 24th. New 35mm print/subs!
    Last edited by arsaib4; 02-21-2005 at 02:33 AM.

  7. #22
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    I watched a VHS of it. It's not the New Yorker release, but one released in Europe. I got it letterboxed so good to go. I would recommend Maculin/Feminin although I'm assuming you've already seen it before, I personally like it more than Two or Three Things. I also got a copy of La Chinoise, which I'll probably get to later today. Right now I'm watching Titicut Follies, so I'll let you all know how that turns out.

  8. #23
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    Frederick Wiseman finally

    Watched Titicut Follies (1967), my first Wiseman film, and I believe I'll need to see much more of his work, to get a firm grasp on it. But it was certainly enough to encourage me to pursue the rest of his catalogue.

  9. #24
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    This is the third time I've mentioned it but I just watched La Chinoise (1967). Again from some undisclosed source I got a copy, and I must say this film was absolutely brilliant, one of his best, and it's been awhile since a Godard film really moved me.

  10. #25
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    I also recommend these films produced by Clive Barker (it's been a gothic few months at my place):

    Gods and Monsters

    A shining moment for Sir Ian McKellen.
    It's like watching a magician slowly reveal his secrets.
    It's about the later-years life of James Whale, the director of Frankenstein and The Bride of Frankenstein.
    Whale was a homosexual artist who was basically shunned by Hollywood after his horror film sucess.
    Brilliant movie. Very compelling.

    Candyman: Farewell to the Flesh

    Bill Condon also directed this Clive Barker story (another expansion of the short story "The Forbidden"), about the Candyman, a guignol that appears when you say his name 5 times...
    "Sweets for the sweet..."


    and Barker's latest feature film project has been postponed- the studio backed out because "We're already making a picture with demons". He should get another studio soon, because TORTURED SOULS could be his piece de resistance
    "Set the controls for the heart of the Sun" - Pink Floyd

  11. #26
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    Originally posted by wpqx
    I watched a VHS of it. It's not the New Yorker release, but one released in Europe. I got it letterboxed so good to go. I would recommend Maculin/Feminin although I'm assuming you've already seen it before, I personally like it more than Two or Three Things. I also got a copy of La Chinoise, which I'll probably get to later today. Right now I'm watching Titicut Follies, so I'll let you all know how that turns out.
    I've seen Masculin but only on video so I'm looking forward to it (I'm going there tomorrow). Rialto has heavily promoted their new 35mm print so I wanna see what they got.

    What issues does the Wiseman film deals with?

  12. #27
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    Re: Re: NASHVILLE

    Originally posted by arsaib4


    Well, I probably don't know as much about Altman as you do, but there's no other way to describe Nashville; it's one of the most poetic American films ever made.
    If there's some equivalent in film to The Great American Novel, I'd consider it to be Nashville. Possibly outdated, yes, after 30 years, but still mostly relevant to our time. I pick up on something new every time I watch it.

    Altman's put out a lot of mediocre films, admittedly. I just ordered California Split off of Netflix; it was recently released on DVD after being out of print for years. My expectations are not as high for this film, but I"m still looking forward to seeing it. As I said before, Nashville, McCabe & Mrs. Miller, and Short Cuts are his three films that just blew me away when I first saw them; no better way to describe them. Guess I'm fascinated by the sociological and psychological perspectives that Altman provides.

  13. #28
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    Well the Wiseman film deals with the treatment of the mentallly ill. A bit jarring film, that was only permitted to be released after 25 years provided they put a disclaimer saying that changes and improvements have been made in the institution. But if you like hearing psychotic people try and rationalize everything, and make the claim to be normal, this film might be of interest. I'll watch any film regardless of what it's about, so I don't even need a good subject.

    As for Altman, I need to watch McCabe again, I really think I missed something there. From the same era I would recommend The Long Goodbye, which is my second favorite film from him. I'm no expert, but I have seen 16 of his films, so a little more knowledgable than the average filmgoer. 17 if you count Popeye, which I haven't seen since I was a kid, and I can't remember anything about it.

  14. #29
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    Well it took a couple of days, but I finished watching Hitler, a Film From Germany last night. Arguably one of the strangest films I have seen, it is half documentary, half fiction, and completely avant-garde. There are two major flags however: 1. It is nearly impossible to find and 2. It is 7 hours long.

    Now most people frequenting this site would have no problem sitting through a 7 hour film, or even one twice as long, but it's hard to recommend a film to someone of the general public by adding that disclaimer. I still know people who refuse to watch Andrei Rublev because it's four hours long.

    As for the film itself, I can't say I was blown away. Was it worth watching, certainly it was. Would I watch it again, probably not. My subtitles were horrible, and half of them were cut off. Granted the dialogue consisted of extremely long sequences of people reading about Hitler, or excerpts from Hitler's speeches. Granted some of this dialogue would have been quite useful, but 7 hours about Hitler, you can pretty much assume what is being discussed.

    Had this film been shrunken down to about half the length, it might be quite a bit stronger, but the full film, just seems to be a little redundant.

  15. #30
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    The Chronicle of a Love (1950), Antonioni's first film, worth watching, but his style as an auteur was still in the early stages of development.

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