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Thread: the LAST FILM YOU'VE SEEN thread

  1. #31
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    High School (1968), my second Wiseman film, this one I liked a little more, and am certainly going to get some more, probably tomorrow.

  2. #32
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    I used to think that I watch too many films but you (wpqx) not only watch more but you find the time to mention all of them (or most of them) on various sites. Good for you!

    Also, if you wanna watch a "fun" film about Hitler, check out the recently released (and Oscar nominated) Downfall from Germany.

  3. #33
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    I'll check that out.

    I watched Thieves Highway (1949), earlier, I thought I mentioned it here, but I guess not. Not exactly one of Dassin's best, but a good transfer.

  4. #34
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    The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976), pardon me, but I don't feel like divulging details.

  5. #35
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    Les Choristes
    I was blown away by the beauty of the music, and the simple but effective shots that Christophe Barratier used... Not much else to say.

    American Beauty
    After putting it off for so long I finally watched it. It was funny but it wasn't a masterpiece... I did like Kevin Spacey's performance though...

  6. #36
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    Masculine Feminine (1966) Theatrical Screening

    Finally got a chance to see this on the big screen and what a treat it was. The new print is immaculate. In this film about "the children of Marx and Coca-Cola" (godard), a young army veteran (Jean-Pierre Léaud) begins a love-affair with a singer (Chantal Goya). Léaud remains as ambivalant about politics as Goya about their curiosity. Godard incorporates many experimental forms in his narrative and his directorial style to depict the confusion, the excitement associated with the era. J. Hoberman said it best, "Directed by anyone else, Masculine Feminine—one of three movies that Godard made in his peak year, 1966—would be a masterpiece. For the young JLG it's business as usual."
    Last edited by arsaib4; 03-09-2005 at 02:36 AM.

  7. #37
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    Watched Padre Padrone (1977), which I believe is the first Taviani brothers film, correct me if I'm wrong. Nothing too extraordinary here, but I tend to get bored extremely quickly with neorealism, espcially when it's post neorealism.

  8. #38
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    Originally posted by wpqx
    Watched Padre Padrone (1977), which I believe is the first Taviani brothers film, correct me if I'm wrong.
    Padre Padrone wasn't their first film but it was the first which truly brought them some attention. Films including A Man for Burning, Under the Sign of Scorpio and St. Michael Had a Rooster were made before. Besides that it's "neo-neorealism" what else you didn't like about it?

  9. #39
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    As far as Padre Padrone, it just bored me. I don't like to think that I need action, but this movie just did nothing for me. I felt nothing for the characters, or the way it was filmed.

    An even worse film that I just watched was Spooky Bunch. Just stay away from this please, do a search on http://www.allmovie.com their rating was pretty accurate.

  10. #40
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    Hypothesis of a Stolen Painting (1978), damn good, and strange work from Raoul Ruiz. Be patient with it though.

  11. #41
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    Originally posted by wpqx
    An even worse film that I just watched was Spooky Bunch.
    That's why I don't just watch anything. There are too many other films out there that deserve our attention in a short amount of time we do have.

    No other filmmaker in Europe has made more features in the last quarter of a century than Ruiz. He isn't always comprehensible but he's never stopped being innovative. Hypothesis is certainly one of his better films. I'd also recommend Genealogies of a Crime, Three Lives and Only One Death, and That Day from the one's I've seen.

  12. #42
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    A few of those Ruiz films are on my to watch list. Well I just watched Ghost (1990), and I absolutely loved it. I always liked the film as a kid, but somehow watching the film years later, I was amazed at how great I thought it was. I mean I was truly blown away.

  13. #43
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    Asfalto (2000) DVD

    It is the fourth film directed by Spanish filmmaker Daniel Calparsoro and if the promise shown earlier in his career has led to this then here's yet another example of why Spanish cinema - from Spain that is - continues to struggle. Chino and Charly (Gustavo Salmerón & Juan Diego Botto) are small time hoods in Madrid who want to move to Amsterdam after one final drug deal. Chino's girlfriend Lucía (Najwa Nimri) gets involved not only with the deal but also with Charly. Also present are Lucía's mother and Chino's brother who happens to be a cop. The drug deal doesn't go through as expected and it's all onward but downward from there.

    It's been a while since I've seen such inept filmmaking. Mr. Calparsoro has no interest at all in dialogue or character development. Any narrative strands are ignored for gratuituous sex-scenes which would've been fine if he didn't exhaust all possibilities early on including a ménage à trois. As for its "crime-thriller" aspect, I've seen that handled better in student films. Asfalto is a disaster and its cast, especially Nimri and Botto, deserve better.
    Last edited by arsaib4; 03-09-2005 at 02:38 AM.

  14. #44
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    Youth of the Beast (1963), innovative Suzuki. His films are a definite example of style over substance, and this is no different. By the end of the film you could care less who did what, but it's always fun watching it unfold.

  15. #45
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    Originally posted by wpqx
    Youth of the Beast (1963), innovative Suzuki. His films are a definite example of style over substance, and this is no different. By the end of the film you could care less who did what, but it's always fun watching it unfold.
    Have you tried the likes of Pistol Opera, Brandid to Kill, and Tokyo Drifter? Suzuki's films are at once both maddening and gratifying.

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