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Thread: All TIME 100 movies

  1. #1
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    All TIME 100 movies

    In this issue ...
    http://www.time.com/time/2005/100movies/index.html
    http://www.time.com/time/2005/100mov...lete_list.html

    A - C
    Aguirre: the Wrath of God (1972)
    The Apu Trilogy (1955, 1956, 1959)
    The Awful Truth (1937)
    Baby Face (1933)
    Bande à part (1964)
    Barry Lyndon (1975)
    Berlin Alexanderplatz (1980)
    Blade Runner (1982)
    Bonnie and Clyde (1967)
    Brazil (1985)
    Bride of Frankenstein (1935)
    Camille (1936)
    Casablanca (1942)
    Charade (1963)
    Children of Paradise (1945)
    Chinatown (1974)
    Chungking Express (1994)
    Citizen Kane (1941)
    City Lights (1931)
    City of God (2002)
    Closely Watched Trains (1966)
    The Crime of Monsieur Lange (1936)
    The Crowd (1928)

    D - F
    Day for Night (1973)
    The Decalogue (1989)
    Detour (1945)
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972)
    Dodsworth (1936)
    Double Indemnity (1944)
    Dr. Strangelove: or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)
    Drunken Master II (1994)
    E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (1982)
    8 1/2 (1963)
    The 400 Blows (1959)
    Farewell My Concubine (1993)
    Finding Nemo (2003)
    The Fly (1986)

    G - J
    The Godfather, Parts I and II (1972, 1974)
    The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (1966)
    Goodfellas (1990)
    A Hard Day's Night (1964)
    His Girl Friday (1940)
    Ikiru (1952)
    In A Lonely Place (1950)
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)
    It's A Gift (1934)
    It's A Wonderful Life (1946)

    K - M
    Kandahar (2001)
    Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949)
    King Kong (1933)
    The Lady Eve (1941)
    The Last Command (1928)
    Lawrence of Arabia (1962)
    Léolo (1992)
    The Lord of the Rings (2001-03)
    The Man With a Camera (1929)
    The Manchurian Candidate (1962)
    Meet Me in St. Louis (1944)
    Metropolis (1927)
    Miller's Crossing (1990)
    Mon oncle d'Amérique (1980)
    Mouchette (1967)

    N - P
    Nayakan (1987)
    Ninotchka (1939)
    Notorious (1946)
    Olympia, Parts 1 and 2 (1938)
    On the Waterfront (1954)
    Once Upon a Time in the West (1968)
    Out of the Past (1947)
    Persona (1966)
    Pinocchio (1940)
    Psycho (1960)
    Pulp Fiction (1994)
    The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985)
    Pyaasa (1957)

    Q - S
    Raging Bull (1980)
    Schindler's List (1993)
    The Searchers (1956)
    Sherlock, Jr. (1924)
    The Shop Around the Corner (1940)
    Singin' in the Rain (1952)
    The Singing Detective (1986)
    Smiles of a Summer Night (1955)
    Some Like It Hot (1959)
    Star Wars (1977)
    A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)
    Sunrise (1927)
    Sweet Smell of Success (1957)
    Swing Time (1936)

    T - Z
    Talk to Her (2002)
    Taxi Driver (1976)
    Tokyo Story (1953)
    A Touch of Zen (1971)
    Ugetsu (1953)
    Ulysses' Gaze (1995)
    Umberto D (1952)
    Unforgiven (1992)
    White Heat (1949)
    Wings of Desire (1987)
    Yojimbo (1961)
    Last edited by hengcs; 05-23-2005 at 11:32 AM.

  2. #2
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    Great to see Leolo on there. It is an overlooked masterpiece. However, I don't think Mouchette is greater than Au hasard balthazar or Diary of a Country priest. Nor do I think City of God is in any way superior to Pixote. Nonetheless, it is an iconoclastic list with some very good choices.
    "They must find it hard, those who have taken authority as truth, rather than truth as authority" Gerald Massey

  3. #3
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    Time magazine's list is "A Taste of Two Dicks". Nothing more.

    Lists like this are great debate starters though.

    Some choices you may like but I sure didn't:

    Kandahar representing Iranian Cinema.

    Notorious over Vertigo.

    Talk to Her representing Spanish-language Cinema.

    McCarey's The Awful Truth over McCarey's Make Way for Tomorrow (both 1937)

    Blade Runner over 2001.

    The Crime of M. Lange over The Rules of the Game.

    Finding Nemo over Classic Disney.

    No Bunuel, no Sirk, no Fuller, no Antonioni, no Dreyer, no Tarkovsky, no Rossellini, no Resnais but two Sergio Leones, Drunken Master II, The Fly, City of God, A Touch of Zen, It's a Gift, Leolo and Camille.

  4. #4
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    "No Bunuel, no Sirk, no Fuller, no Antonioni, no Dreyer, no Tarkovsky, no Rossellini, no Resnais..."

    There's a Bunuel with The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, but shockingly none of the others. Also, no Oliveira and Pialat, but I've gotten used to that. No Kiarostami either, but a weak Makhmalbaf!

    Still, some great choices that you don't normally see.

  5. #5
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    Yes, there's a Bunuel and a classic Disney I also overlooked (Pinocchio).
    No Kiarostami, no Hou, no Dovzhenko, no Tourneur, no Eisenstein, no Saura, no Erice and no fucking Murnau!
    A few of my very favorites are there though: Kane, Aguirre, Searchers, Ugetsu and Tokyo Story.
    And a single movie I haven't seen: Nayakan.

  6. #6
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    Not to be picky, but Sunrise (Murnau) is there.

    Nayakan is directed by Mani Ratnam (The Youth). It's an Indian "Godfather" in many ways, but much more violent.

  7. #7
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    I'm going to blame overlooking Sunrise on Dwayne Wade breaking my heart tonight with his 7-out-of-25 game.
    I'll try to watch Nayakan. My fave Indian film is still The Cloud-Capped Star.

  8. #8
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    Hit Some, Miss Some

    I had haven't seen most of these films, in part, due to my relative age (I focused more on 1960 movies and onwards) and my limited scope of American movies. Yet I am curious about some of these selections such as:

    Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) over The Day The Earth Stood Still (1951). I feel that The Day The Earth Stood Still is considered more significant in terms of contemporary social impact (the liberal viewpoint) versus the more conservative, anti-communistic version of Body Snatchers.

    The Fly (1996) over the original 1958 version or any number of horror movies such as the Exorcist, Rosemary's Baby, The Omen, Jurassic Park, The Shining, The Sixth Sense.

    I also have to disagree as others have to the omission of 2001: A Space Odyssey.

    I had also hoped to see Dr. Zhivago, Alien, How the West was Won, Dances With Wolves, West Side Story, The Incredibles, Apocalypse Now, Clockwork Orange.


    I am glad to see Bladerunner and Brazil on this list.

  9. #9
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    Yeah, I was watching it too. Pistons are my favorite. No stars, but they're a TEAM.

    No Ghatak either, but that's nothing new. My choice is still Ray's Trilogy when it comes to Indian Cinema.

  10. #10
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    Pistons are still the champs but I give HEAT a chance to de-throne them. Flash had open looks and kept missing shots he normally makes. Dylan and I have tix for Game 2 and we expect a different result. I know we may be kidding ourselves.

    Originally posted by tabuno
    I had haven't seen most of these films, in part, due to my relative age (I focused more on 1960 movies and onwards) and my limited scope of American movies.

    There's a lot of great American films but films from elsewhere provide alternative sources of pleasure and edification. Same goes for older films, including silents.

    Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) over The Day The Earth Stood Still (1951). I feel that The Day The Earth Stood Still is considered more significant in terms of contemporary social impact (the liberal viewpoint) versus the more conservative, anti-communistic version of Body Snatchers.

    This list simply reflects the taste of two people, not any claims to "significance". Actually, some people interpret Snatchers as an attack on McCarthy-era hysteria. As for horror, I love Jacques Tourneur's American movies like I Walked with a Zombie and I hate Catholic-propaganda dependent on special effects like The Exorcist.

  11. #11
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    you bastard, you just beat me to this, oh well guess I don't have to post the link. Anybody else amazed that they picked Dodsworth as the best film of the 1930's?

  12. #12
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    Also, no The Rules of the Game, but The Crime of Monsieur Lange is the only Renoir.

    No Annie Hall or Manhattan, but The Purple Rose of Cairo for Allen.

    One of their Bergmans include Smiles of a Summer Night over Wild Strawberries and Seventh Seal.

    I don't mind their choice of Ulysses' Gaze for Angelopoulos, but I would've preferred The Travelling Players.

  13. #13
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    It's a very admirable list- they seem to be aiming for a "general all-around-please everybody" type scroll.

    I read today that they both said they didn't like Gone With The Wind- "a faux epic"

    Ok.

    No complaints whatsoever: (37)

    Barry Lyndon
    Apu Trilogy - anybody who doesn't like S. Ray doesn't know cinema.
    Bande a part
    Aguirre, The Wrath of God
    Casablanca
    Children of Paradise
    Chinatown
    Citizen Kane
    City Lights
    City of God
    Dr. Strangelove
    The Dekalog
    8 1/2
    The 400 Blows
    The Godfather
    The Good, The Bad & The Ugly
    A Hard Day's Night
    Ikiru
    It's a Wonderful Life
    Lawrence of Arabia
    The Man With a Movie Camera
    Metropolis
    Meet Me in St. Louis
    On The Waterfront
    Once Upon a Time in the West
    Pulp Fiction
    Raging Bull
    The Searchers
    Singin' in the Rain
    Smiles of a Summer Night
    Some Like it Hot
    Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans
    A Streetcar Named Desire
    Taxi Driver
    Tokyo Story
    Ugetsu M.
    Yojimbo

    The above titles are without question worthy of a top 100 list.

    But as others have mentioned, no 2001: A Space Odyssey OR Clockwork Orange (ACO should be mandatory on any top 100 list) placating Kubrick fans with Barry Lyndon is good but not acceptable- I would have put Paths of Glory on a top 100. There's no Eisenstein, No Tarkovsky, 1 Bunuel?!, no Fuller, no Cassavetes, Day For Night over Jules et Jim, E.T but no Wizard of Oz, The Fly but no Exorcist, Persona but no Seventh Seal ?!?!?!

    and on and on.

    Should I get mad?
    "Set the controls for the heart of the Sun" - Pink Floyd

  14. #14
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    No you shouldn't. If I posted my top 100 and said it was definitive, you'd all jump on me, for many of the same ommisions. I wouldn't have an Eisenstein film on my list, and personally it's refreshing to see sacred cows like Potemkin, Rules of the Game, and above all Vertigo not on a list. There are a few films on there that I haven't even heard of much less seen, so always a good thing to get some new ideas. I would like to add that although it is a matter of personal taste, no 2001 is nearly unforgivable. Cheers on Olympia though, damn good film.

  15. #15
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    Originally posted by Johann
    The Fly but no Exorcist,
    Should I get mad?
    I may never understand why even cool people I like a lot think The Exorcist is a great film. Maybe the problem is within me, more specifically my belief that the devil is a man-made, faith-through-fear concept.

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