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Thread: Favorites Of 1993

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  1. #1
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    Favorites Of 1993

    Favorite English-Language Films of 1993

    1. THE BOYS OF ST. VINCENT (John N. Smith)
    2. GROUNDHOG DAY (Harold Ramis)
    -- WITTGENSTEIN (Derek Jarman)
    4. IN THE NAME OF THE FATHER (Jim Sheridan)
    -- NAKED (Mike Leigh)
    -- THE NIGHTMARE BEFORE CHRISTMAS (Tim Burton)
    -- THE PIANO (Jane Campion)
    -- RAINING STONES (Ken Loach)
    9. CALENDAR (Atom Egoyan)
    -- SCHINDLER'S LIST (Steven Spielberg)
    -- SHORT CUTS (Robert Altman)

    Best Documentary:IT'S ALL TRUE (Orson Welles-Richard Wilson)


    Runners Up
    Bad Boy Bubby, Dottie Gets Spanked, Ruby in Paradise, The Secret Garden, The Remains of the Day, Matinee, King of the Hill, Menace II Society, A Perfect World, Dazed and Confused.
    Last edited by oscar jubis; 06-28-2017 at 09:25 AM.

  2. #2
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    Favorite Foreign-Language Films of 1993

    1. THE PUPPETMASTER (Hou Hsiao Hsien/Taiwan)
    2. THE BLUE KITE (Tian Zhuanzhuang/China)
    3. FAREWELL MY CONCUBINE (Chen Kaige/China)
    4. ABRAHAM'S VALLEY (Manoel de Oliveira/Portugal)
    -- THREE COLORS:BLUE (Chen Kaige/China)
    6. LATCHO DROM (Tony Gatlif/France)
    -- THE MAN BY THE SHORE (Raoul Peck/Haiti)
    -- MY FAVORITE SEASON (Andre Techine/France)
    9. THE BIRTH OF LOVE (Philippe Garrel/France)
    -- THE DEAD MOTHER (J. Bajo Ulloa/Spain)
    -- THE SCENT OF GREEN PAPAYA (Trah Anh Hung/Vietnam)

    Runners Up

    Faraway, So Close!, 32 Short Films about Glenn Gould, The Women From the Lake of Scented Souls, The Red Squirrel, Fassbinder: I Don't Just Want You to Love Me, The Beginning and the End, Cronos, The Wedding Banquet.
    Last edited by oscar jubis; 06-29-2006 at 01:51 PM.

  3. #3
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    My pick would probably have to be The Piano. With great performances by Keitel, Hunter, and Neill, a haunting score by Michael Nyman, and fantastic use of color in the cinematography, this is one of my favorite films of all time. Playing Nyman's pieces on the piano is quite difficult but very enjoyable.

    I think I've voiced my opinion on Dazed and Confused before. I viewed it at the exact right time in my life and it's always stuck with me. It's sort of a time capsule of the 70s, but at the same time is eternal in its themes.
    "So I'm a heel, so what of it?"
    --Renaldo the Heel, from Crimewave

  4. #4
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    *Let's not forget to mention Anna Paquin, who became the second youngest person to win an Oscar for her performance in The Piano.

    *I'm glad you qualified "capsule of the 70s" with "sort of" because, even though the film gets period specifics right, it's set on an extraordinary day (the last day of school). You wouldn't figure for instance, by watching Dazed and Confused that 70s highschoolers spent more time studying than teens today. This is not meant as criticism of the movie, but I wouldn't advise you to draw conclusions about 70s youth based on it. One single scene rings false: the scene of the hazing of the girls in a parking lot. It's choreographed into contrivance. Find post I wrote after last viewing here: Dazed and Confused

  5. #5
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    I guess it's just better to say that the film is really more about high school than being set in the 70s. I watched it right before I went into high school, and as I have traveled through this bizarre educational establishment through the years, I've really found a majority of people to be affiliated with these, for lack of a better word, archetypes of characters. I've never met a 20-something fella with a moustache that parties with high-schoolers, though.
    "So I'm a heel, so what of it?"
    --Renaldo the Heel, from Crimewave

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    I agree that D&C's characters are archetypes and that the majority of kids one would meet at a high school would have some affiliation with one or more of these. The number and variety of characters involved facilitates this process of identification. As a matter of fact, I see a lot of myself in at least one of the film's characters.

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    Rolf de Heer's controversial BAD BOY BUBBY, which was not released theatrically in the US due to scenes depicting animal cruelty and incest, has found a place just inside my 1993 Top 10. This is a fable about a man-child who manages to escape the dungeon where his mother has held him prisoner for 35 years and how he finds a place in the outside world (more specifically, Adelaide, in South Australia) with the help of a rock band and a nurse named Angel. Rolf de Heer (THE TRACKER, THE QUIET ROOM, 10 CANOES) is, along with Jane Campion, the best Australian filmmaker of the past 20 years.

    BAD BOY BUBBY was recently released on a 3-disc Blu-Ray set in both the US and the UK.

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    I revised my list of favorites of 1993 after back to back viewings of Derek Jarman's magnificent biopic WITTGENSTEIN. It's about 70 minutes long and I think it's his best film. It is now listed as #2 in my English-language list. I'd like to know if anyone reading this has seen it, and has an opinion about it.

  9. #9
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    I don't think I liked it but I'll take another look at it. I take Wittgenstein too seriously to see him as a campy spectacle. I do like Jarman but not unreservedly; I do value his originality and his splendid images and atmosphere.

  10. #10
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    Trust me, I also take him seriously and understand his importance. This is a really good film in my opinion, it gives a sense of the trajectory of his life and explains the arguments and claims that continue to be so influential to this day.

  11. #11
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    While Wittgenstein had an influence on the subject of philosophy, the film attempts to convey most of that complex thought process through a series of short scenes or vignettes that are performed in less of a film modality and more as if this was a stage show in the theater. Actors move about on sets that are singularly lit and the acting is often nothing but reading lines to the air. While colorful at times, this kind of "art" film becomes something of a bore as we jump around Wittgenstein's life told in various stages by a little boy or an adult actor.

    Here is a link to see the entire film on You Tube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6WzqyO-wIMI

    Here is another link to hear a lecture on the life of Wittgenstein: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TNaBRR-XeAs

    Wittgenstein was a protégé of Bertrand Russell - here is a link to a Russell interview where he mentions Wittgenstein: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bZv3pSaLtY

    I am a bigger fan of William James than I am of Wittgenstein.
    Colige suspectos semper habitos

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