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Thread: Cannes 2012, May 16-27

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    Cannes 2012, May 16-27


    The official 2012 Cannes poster

    FROM MUBI:

    CANNES 2012: THE ANTICIPATION
    It’s just a little over two weeks away now, the main event of any year in cinema: The Cannes Film Festival. With the full lineup unveiled, we’ve been tracking advance word on each of the films in the Official Selection, collecting images, the occasional trailer, the works. Abbas Kiarostami, Alain Resnais, Hong Sang-soo, Michael Haneke — they’re all right here. Keep up with all the news coming out of the Cannes Film Festival on our Facebook page, too!


    As I track a festival at the tail end of the film festival year, the year is about to begin. I may be in Paris for a while, but I won't be at Cannes, and won't be around for the whole time, but I can report on it some. First off Wes Anderson's new movie is the opener, and there is what looks like it may be a serious movie that has Zac Efron in it (Lee 'Precious' Daniels' The Paperboy.) David Cronenberg's Cosmopolis will be featured, and Jean-Pierre Dardenne will preside over the jury. Xavier Dolan, whom Cannes loves, has a new film about a transexual. Jacques Audiard has a new one called Rust & Bone, a smaller quieter one this time, maybe, but with some intense changes, with Marion Cotillard in a key role at the center of the changes. I don't know if I'll like it, but Audiard's films have impressed me so far, each one more than the last. Michael Haneke produces variable results, but he is an awesome director. His new one has at the center of it a couple in their eighties, former music teachers, and their daughter. It stars Isabelle Huppert, Jean-Louis Trintignant, William Shimell (of Certified Copy), and Emanuelle Riva (of Hiroshima Mon Amour).
    Last edited by Chris Knipp; 05-27-2012 at 03:31 PM.

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    The Jury is interesting this year. (actually they are MOST years)

    Write as much as you can my friend. And post more Parisian photos on Facebook! I love your photography.
    "Set the controls for the heart of the Sun" - Pink Floyd

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    Thank you. I'll do my best.

    You can find a selection of my Paris photos from last year on Flickr in two sets Paris and Paris 2

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    Awesome.
    To twist what Orson Welles once said: A photo is never really good unless the camera is an eye in the head of an ARTIST.
    "Set the controls for the heart of the Sun" - Pink Floyd

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    Nicely twisted.

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    CANNES OPENING DAY, MAY 16, 2012


    STILL FROM MOONRISE KINGDOM

    Funny thing about Cannes this year, women are well represented in the jury, but there is not a single film directed by a woman in competition.

    Wes Anderson is on hand for the first time and his movie opens the festival. Chairman of the jury is Nanni Moretti, whose THE SON'S ROOM won the Golden Palm in 2001. Ladies include Diane Kruger, Emanuelle Devos, Andrea Arnold, and the Palestinian actress/filmmaker Hiram Abbas. There is also Ewan McGregor and the designer Jean-Paul Gautier. Alexander Payne and Haitian director Raoul Peck round out the (main) jury. There is also the Un Certain Regard jury, Tim Roth (chairman), Leila Bekhti, Tonie Marchall, Lucian Montegudo, and Sylvie Pras, members.

    Besides the lack of films by women, a complaint is that there are many familiar names in the competition selections. But it's not that they won't be of interest. Some notable ones:

    Lee Daniels THE PAPERBOY
    Wes Anderson MONRISE KINGDOM
    Alain Resnais YOU AIN'T SEEN NOTHING YET/VOUS N'AVEZ ENCORE RIEN VU!
    Michael Haneke LOVE
    Abbas Kiarostami LIKE SOMEONE IN LOVE
    Christian Mungau BEYOND THE HILLS
    Jacques Audiard RUST AND BONE/DE ROUILLE ET D'OS
    Thomas Vinterberg THE HUNT/JAGTER
    David Cronenberg COSMOPOLIS
    Walter Salles ON THE ROAD
    Claude Miller [who recently died] THRÉRÈSE DESQUEROUX
    Yousri Nasrallah AFTER THE BATTLE


    PRECIOUS was a Cannes prizewinner. Wes Anderson is always distinctive, and featuring his new film for opening night will bring him more French and international attention. Like Woody Allen's opening night film last year MIDNIGHT IN PARIS, MOONRISE KINGDOM opens simultaneiously in Paris and trailers of it are showing all the time in French cinems. Renais is unstoppable; he's now 90.


    YOU AIN'T SEEN NOTHING YET!--RESNAIS

    Haneke's LOVE concerns an old couple; a more intimate subject for him. Kiarostami's new one again is set behind the wheel of a car, this time in an odd Japanese setting. Audiard's RUST AND BONE opens in Paris May 17, and it the most anticipated French film of the moment, much advertised in Paris, posters everywhere, trailers in theaters all the time. Cronenberg's COSMOPOLIS opens after I leave but is also much advertised in Paris, posters all over the Metro. Ditto Walter Salles' ON THE ROAD, which opens soon, and has trailers showing in cinemas. Miller's THÉRÈSE DESQUEROUX is from a very dark novel by the classic modern French authoer François Mauriac, and Audrey Tautou stars in it, a big step away from her cuteness and sweetness. Yousri Nasrallah's AFTER THE BATTLE refers to the battles in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo during last year's Egyptian revolution, and is the only political film in competition. It may be a bit premature to do a film about such recent events, but the effort sounds daring.

    Robert Pattinson is the star of COSMOPOLIS; this will show if he can make a strong transition from his Twilight overexposure to serious actor status like, say, Brad Pitt. The coldness of Cronenberg's style is suited to the novelist Don DeLillo, from whose work this film is adapted, but that may be a marriage made in heaven or simply too much of a muchness, we'll see.


    FRENCH COSMOPOLIS POSTER

    RUST AND BONE combines French megastar Marion Cotillard with the Belgian actor Matthias Schoenaerts (of BULLHEAD), the latter an intensely physical actor and simply a great new actor. The director dares to cut off the legs of one of the worlds most winning and lovely young actresses: she becomes paraplegic in the film. A bold choice and a bold choice of actors which already promise a challenge to filmmaker and viewer.

    [Image has to be replaced.]
    SCHOENAERTS AND COTILLARD IN RUST AND BONE

    An adaptation of ON THE ROAD has been a long time coming. Salles tackled an iconic road text before with THE MOTORCYCLE DIARIES. The result was engaging but a little lacking in depth. Will this be the same? The choices for the female leads are Kristen Stewart, Amy Adams and Kirsten Dunst. Viggo Mortensen as Old Bull Lee is an obvious William S. Burroughs surrogate/clone. Garrett Hedlund gets the key role of Kerouac's idol Dead Moriarity, and Sam Riley plays Kerouac's alter ego, Sal Paradise. I'm guessing this is going to be in the "nice try" category, but it may drum up some evocation of the thrill and innocence of bohemian American Fifties youth, if we're lucky, that could have some moving moments.


    STILL FROM SALLES' ON THE ROAD

    Haneke begins with an amazing choice of actors, Jean-Louis Trintignat and Isabelle Huppert. As still suggests Tritignant has not lost his intensity.


    TRINTIGANT AND HUPPERT IN HANEKE'S LOVE



    ______________

    Apitchatpong Weerasethakul is out of competition with a documentary.
    Last edited by Chris Knipp; 08-24-2012 at 02:23 PM.

  7. #7
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    Excellent Chris. Love your postings.
    "Set the controls for the heart of the Sun" - Pink Floyd

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    Thanks, Johann.

    As I said my timing in Paris isn't as Cannes-friendly as last year, but it will come about the same, because I will provide two "Cannes reviews": of Wes Anderson's MOONRISE KINGDOM, which I just saw tonight, and of Jacques Audiard's RUST AND BONE, which I expect to see tomorrow afternoon. It looks like despite my saying there was only a mediocre selection of films in Paris this time, I am seeing and writing about slightly more films in my PARIS MOVIE REPORT this year than on previous years or times.

    If you want to follow MIKE D'ANGELO's Twitter Cannes thumbnail reviews -- and in my view he's one of the most authentic and accessible American voices on Cannes we have -- as well as through Twitter the most up-to-the-minute -- you will find them here:

    https://twitter.com/#!/gemko

    He gave MOONDISE KINGDOM A 75, which is very, very high for him. He explained his rating system yesterday thus:
    Mike D'Angelo ‏@gemko
    (Reminder before Cannes tweet-reviews begin tomorrow: 50=average, not F. 60+ good. 70+ excellent. 80+ phenomenal. 90+ all but unheard of.)
    Variety's DeBruge's MOONRISE KINGDOM reivew comes off as more lukewarm, but still as often with Variety, may provide probably as detailed and accurate a US review of the film likely to come out of Cannes and one that in this case not unfair. He writes:
    While Anderson is essentially a miniaturist, making dollhouse movies about meticulously appareled characters in perfectly appointed environments, each successive film finds him working on a more ambitious scale. Co-written by Roman Coppola, "Moonrise Kingdom" may not be set anywhere so exotic as a Mediterranean boat ("The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou") or a trans-Indian train ("The Darjeeling Limited"), but it feels even more finely detailed than any of his previous live-action outings. Still, the love story reads loud and clear, charming those not put off by all the production's potentially distracting ornamentation.
    There in fact is a terrific balance between the awesomely intricate orchestration (literally) and the simple direct real quality of the young adolescent actors.

    D'ANGELO is adding some photos with a few of his tweets, and I may put up one or two here, because they add to the immediacy of his picture of Cannes.

    Here is one (I like night shots anyway, and just took a bunch of them in Paris tonight):

    Photo by Mike D'Angelo, Cannes correspondent for Onion AV Club:


    Photo by Mike D'Angelo

    His caption for it:
    Entrance to Salle Debussy (where Un Certain Regard is screened, plus Comp press screenings) at night, from across st.
    See the IndieWire evaluation and description of Mike D'Angelo here:. It says he is " is one of the true masters of the 140 character review," and they quote the opening of his "open letter" to Lars von Trier about ANTICHRIST, which is what really made me fall in love with his festival coverage: "I love you, man. Not in a lame, hokey Rudd-and-Segal bromance way, but deeply and profoundly. If our paths cross over the next couple of days while you’re in town, don’t be surprised if I walk up unannounced and give you a giant bear hug. I’m pretty sure I kind of despised your new movie, 'Antichrist,' but that doesn’t remotely matter. Thank you. Thank you for having the guts to make something as insane and offensive and wholly uncompromising as this." Such passion and enthusiasm is, of course, not available to VARIETY reviewers, and we need it to remind us why we love movies.

    I will put up some of my own current Paris photos on this thread, especially ones relevant to the reviews and Cannes.
    Last edited by Chris Knipp; 08-24-2012 at 01:49 PM.

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    D'Angelo has added MOONRISE KINGDOM to his 2012 top ten list. I've only seen three on it, MOONRISE KINGDOM, BEING FLYNN, AND NEIGHBORING SOUNDS, which latter I like very much. Others also are saying Beast of the Southern Wild, which is at Cannes in Un Certain Regard after Sundance success, is great. It was in the SFIFF but I missed it.

    01. Moonrise Kingdom (Wes Anderson, USA)
    02. Pursuit of Loneliness (Laurence Thrush, USA)
    03. Looper* (Rian Johnson, USA)
    04. Young & Wild (Marialy Rivas, Chile)
    05. Beasts of the Southern Wild (Benh Zeitlin, USA)
    06. The Queen of Versailles (Lauren Greenfield, USA)
    07. Neighboring Sounds (Kleber Mendonça Filho, Brazil)
    08. Wanderlust (David Wain, USA)
    09. Compliance (Craig Zobel, USA)
    10. Being Flynn (Paul Weitz, USA)
    --Mike D'Angelo's website
    Last edited by Chris Knipp; 09-20-2012 at 08:09 PM.

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    ANOTHER MIKE D'ANGELO LIVE FEED CANNES FESTIVAL PHOTO


    CAPTION: Press mailbox area right after a screening
    (in this case MOONRISE KINGDOM) lets out.


    Unlike the French critics, who if Allociné is to be trusted have given RUST AND BONE a much higher rating than MOONRISE KINGDOM, D'Angelo gave Audiard's new film a 64 vs. a 75 for Anderson (though he has been known to edit his ratings). His latest tweet on RUST AND BONE:

    Judging from my feed so far, people don't quite seem to have understood what RUST AND BONE is up to.
    His thumbnail review:
    Rust and Bone (Audiard): 64. The story of a horribly disabled person, and also of a woman with no legs. Stealthy reverse schematism! I like.
    --https://twitter.com/#!/gemko
    Last edited by Chris Knipp; 05-17-2012 at 05:47 AM.

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    MOONRISE KINGDOM.

    I have seen it and will post my review on my PARIS MOVIE REPORT thread here.



    KAREN HAYWARD AND JARED GILMAN IN MOONRISE KINGDOM

    As I mentioned, Mike D'Angelo gave MOONRISE KINGDOM a 75, which by his system is an "excellent" rating, like an 88 or 90. [

    Metacritic gives MOONRISE KINGDOM 75 so far but its listed review ratings are 80, 80, 80, 70, Variety's being the lower one. CORRECTION, late on May 17th: it has now gone up to 79, with another 80 and an 88-rated review for Haneke and Carax, shown later..

    Metacritic thumbnail quotes:

    TODD MCCARTHY (Hollywood Reporter): This is a Wes Anderson film -- more lightweight than some, possessing a stronger emotional undertow than others -- that will strike the uninitiated as conspicuously arch.

    PETER BRADSHAW (The Guardian): A very charming, beautifully wrought, if somehow depthless film - eccentric but heartfelt, and thought through to the tiniest, quirkiest detail in the classic Anderson style.

    PETER HAMMOND (Box Office Magazine): The director of quirky fare with a rabid cult-like following has made a charming, magical and really funny new work about two unique young kids discovering love over one unforgettable summer, and it's the director's most accessible movie yet.

    I'd pay most attention to Hammond.
    Last edited by Chris Knipp; 05-27-2012 at 03:30 PM.

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    RUST AND BONE.

    I've posted my second Cannes competition film review on my PARIS MOVIE REPORT here. Audiard has made a powerful and visceral film. After A Prophet he wanted to do something smaller, but moving to a romance has not taken him away from violence -- not with a beautful woman (star of the moment Marion Cotillard) who's rendered legless in a terrible accident and a distant brute of a boyfriend played by the physically intense rising Belgian actor Matthias Schoenaerts.


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    Mike D'Angelo's Day One piece, "Cannes '12, Day One: Wes Anderson kicks off the festival in enchanting form," is on AV Club here.

    He lists (and I've highlighted in boldface) some titles or directors in this year's Cannes that I didn't get from the International Herald Tribune article I was relying on above:

    Right now, of course, I’m still very much in the drooling stage. This year’s lineup looks sensational on paper, with something for everyone: hardcore art films from international auteurs like Carlos Reygadas (whose Silent Light was my favorite film here five years ago) and Léos Carax (bringing his first feature since 2000’s POLA X); star-studded American genre fare like Killing Them Softly (with Brad Pitt) and The Paperboy (featuring Matthew McConaughey and Nicole Kidman); fascinating change-of-pace efforts by old favorites (Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami’s Like Someone in Love has a Japanese cast, while In Another Country, the latest from South Korea’s Hong Sang-soo, stars Isabelle Huppert)[/b]; and much more. David Cronenberg is here with his adaptation of Don DeLillo’s Cosmopolis, but I’m arguably even more curious about Antiviral, a film in the Un Certain Regard section written and directed by his son Brandon. Room 237, the conspiracy-theory doc about Kubrick’s The Shining that I missed at Sundance, plays in the Fortnight. (I won’t miss it again.) There are just so many opportunities to be disappointed! -- Mike D'Angelo, AV Club.
    He calls MOONRISE KINGDOM "delightful" and writes a paragraph about it, but leaves it to the AV Club's regular reviewer to write about it at more length when it comes out in the US shortly.

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    A N|Y Times report has come out on Cannes, and Manohla Dargis, the correspondant, says of MOONRISE KINGDOM that it " is one of Mr. Anderson’s supreme achievements: It’s wondrously beautiful, often droll and at times hauntingly melancholic." I'll settle for that!

    She calls the theme of RUST AND BONE "moral awakening", and that works too. There is that aspect, but it's really more Ali's awakening to his emotions.
    Last edited by Chris Knipp; 05-18-2012 at 09:42 AM.

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    Another Cannes selection I didn't know about:

    Matteo Garrone, REALITY. Variety review: http://www.variety.com/review/VE1117947568/

    Mike D'Angelo's twitter review: Reality (Garrone): 66. Another film w/only one idea, but at least it's a bold one. Feels like something Buñuel would make if he were alive.

    Top-tier helmer Matteo Garrone proved his talent for slice-of-life realism and visual confidence even before "Gomorrah," but he's never been dull until "Reality." This comes as a surprise due to not only Garrone's track record, but also the material he's tackling, about a Neapolitan fish seller who turns delusional over "Big Brother." Reality-TV addiction is overripe for satire, yet the script here swerves from anything biting, opting for an affectionate look at a family and the rabbit hole this father of three jumps into on his mad quest for celebrity. International sales are likely, though reception will be fuzzy.--Jay Weissberg, Variety.

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