Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 36

Thread: New Directors/New Films and Film Comment Selects 2014 General Forum thread

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Ottawa Canada
    Posts
    5,656
    The Film Comment Selects seems like a fantastic menu of movies- Raul Ruiz, a new Bertolucci, and Denis Villeneuve's Enemy are ones I'd check out.
    The New Directors series is a great idea to expose new talents-I wish I could see them. You are in the zeitgeist of movie-watching at the moment Chris. New York is a REAL movie town.
    I'd love to have the time and wherewithal to see and write about these films like you do. (Reading about them is the next-best thing, tho...)

    I've been watching Scorsese's HUGO a lot on DVD recently. It is hypnotic. The third time I watched it I noticed that Melies (Ben Kingsley) is sitting at the counter of the toy shop in a shot in the exact same pose as his automaton is put in by Jude Law- looking down and hand on the table- So, George Melies IS his automaton. Makes sense, doesn't it? The automaton creates pictures, and so does Melies.....
    "Set the controls for the heart of the Sun" - Pink Floyd

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    16,055
    I missed ENEMY at FCS because could not go at night and no screener, but it opens in NY cinemas tomorrow and I'll be going this weekend. I did see and reviewed the new Bertolucci. The Raul Ruiz was not new but 1983. Yes this is a great movie town, the best for English-speakers. Paris offers other things not available here. They say Toronto is a great movie town and there are those who love the Montreal Film Festival, someone I liked very much at Lincoln Center screenings who died last year, Mitch Banks, said it was his favorite. And he had been a regular at Cannes, Rotterdam.


    Mitch Banks by CK
    Last edited by Chris Knipp; 08-30-2017 at 06:45 PM.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    16,055


    TRAP STREET/SHUIYIN JIE (Vivian Qu 2013)--ND/NF

    A cute young guy falls in love with a mysterious woman and then he gets in trouble because she works at a secret government site and they think he had an ulterior motive in meeting her. First feature from China has lots about the information age's invasion of privacy and mapping of the world, but also light, lively scenes and Hitchcockisn moments. A fine beginning.

    THE STRANGE COLOR OF YOUR BODY'S TEARS/L'ÉTRANGE COULEUR DES LARMES DE TON CORPS (Hélène Cattet, Bruno Forzani 2013)--ND/NF

    Exercise in pure style by the Belgian couple who made ND/NF 2010 AMER, likewise based on Italian Dario Argento "giallo" slasher-horror films. Catnip for cultists, unwatchable for others. This team has a formidable team and technique if they choose to make a regular film.
    Last edited by Chris Knipp; 01-01-2015 at 05:44 PM.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Ottawa Canada
    Posts
    5,656
    20,000 Days on Earth is one I will have to check out. Nick Cave is a fascinating man to me. A friend saw him perform in Belgium last year and she said it was like going to church.

    Denis Villeneuve seems to have struck a new actor/director match: himself & Jake G.
    "Set the controls for the heart of the Sun" - Pink Floyd

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    16,055
    I wish I'd learned more about Nick Cave from 20,000 DAYS ON EARTH but it is certainly a stylish and flowing present-day portrait which I'll be reporting on shortly.

    I don't know if Villeneuve and Jake are on a long-term thing-- I think for some reason they did the two movies close together but PRISONER came out quite a while before ENEMY. I hated PRISONERS and am hoping ENEMY will restore the confidence in the director I got from INCENDIES.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,627
    Outstanding as always, Chris. Trying to read your posts before I rush back to work. Here is social media link

    https://www.facebook.com/newdirectors
    Colige suspectos semper habitos

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    16,055
    Good, thanks.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    16,055

    MARCH 19-30 2014
    PUBLIC SCREENINGS


    Final day of ND/NF press screenings (Mar. 14).

    SHE'S LOST CONTROL (Anja Marquardt 2014)--ND/NF

    Maybe so has the director. The gauche title of this American indie first film is a hint that this isn't really successful. It's supposed to be about how people are more out of touch and focuses on a woman getting a masters in social psychology who works as a sex surrogate referred by a psychotherapist to help people with intimacy issues. Nothing is believable or quite clear, everybody is uptight.

    SALVO (Fabio Grassadonia, Antonio Piazza 2013)--ND/NF

    Sicily. A cool, chiseled mafia bodyguard (Saleh Bakri) kils a rival who's ordered out a hit on the man he guards. In the process, he rescues a young blind woman (Sara Serraiocco ) who ought to have been collateral damage and goes into hiding with her. This unusual film has a virtuoso long take sequence that is also virtuoso acting, and is an usual combination of gangster thriller and operatic doomed romance laced with epic spaghetti western style and a touch of dry comedy. Winners of the Critics' Week grand prize at Cannes last year. This debut is good news for Italian cinema.

    20,000 DAYS ON EARTH Ian Forsyth, Jane Pollard 2013)--ND/NF

    A suave elegant 'biopic' that dodges the cliches of the genre, by and about the Australian singer songwriter Nick Cave, who wisely avoids archival footage and simply talks about himself, to wife and friends (sitting beside him in his Jaguar), to a shrink, to archivists. Entertaining and artful, but all the facts aren't here. This is the closing night film of the New Directors/New Films series.

    For my recommendations and comments on this year's New Directors/New Films sereis (and the few Film Comment Selects films I saw) and thanks to the organizers and staff, go here.
    Last edited by Chris Knipp; 01-01-2015 at 05:45 PM.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    4,843
    The university had a 2-day colloquium with novelist and filmmaker Abdellah Taia, which concluded with a screening of SALVATION ARMY followed by panel discussion and Q&A. I would not characterize the style of the film as "harsh" or "Bressonian". It is fragmented though, and the ending is a bit abrupt, as you say. Actually, the ending is more than a bit abrupt, and surprisingly downbeat given that, as you point, the protagonist achieves his objective of relocating in Europe but does not seem glad to be there. Apparently, the film is quite different from the novel, and those familiar with his literary output appeared somewhat disappointed by what was excised from the book in the process of adaptation to film.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    16,055
    Harsh because there are no frills in the depiction or storytelling at any point. Bressonian? Well, I'm not an expert on Bresson, but the festival blurbs have repeatedly referred to Bresson, including the one at Miami.

    " Taïa finds a film language all his own: at once rigorous and poetic, worthy of Bresson in its concreteness and lucidity" -- MoMA New Directors/New Films blurb.

    With sparing dialogue, stunning painterly cinematography by Agnès Godard and perfectly pitched emotional charge, the film pays homage to both French master Robert Bresson and to the godfather of Egyptian realism, Salah Abu Seif.
    --The Bill, Cosford Cinema, University of Miami

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    4,843
    You're right. I should have mentioned that the film is being marketed as "Bressonian" and my dear colleague who wrote that hagiographic text followed suit (perhaps he felt obligated as a courtesy to our guest).

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    16,055
    SALVATION ARMY (Abdellah Taïa), cont'd.

    Festival blurbs can't be trusted, but I thought the film SALVATION ARMY was Bressonian. If you don't, why? Jay Weissberg (VARIETY) reviewing the film at Cannes Critics' Week and Alastain McCartney reviewing the book alone both point out the book is much warmer and more life-affirming, and one wonders why. Anyway, I stick by my description of the film.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    4,843
    I can't respond because I don't know what is it about the film that merits the qualification of "Bressonian", which I associate with a style Paul Schrader called "transcendental" over 30 years ago. I recognize this is a matter of opinion and I am willing to believe that many people think of Bresson when they watch this movie. I didn't.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    16,055
    Got it. I think it's meant as a compliment though.

    That's interesting that you insist on that stipulation that it can't be "Bressonian" because it's not "transcendental" (are you sure?-- that the movie isn't "transcendental" that is?) because in a 2012 discussion between Kent Jones and Jonathan Rosenbaum at Film Forum around a Bresson retrospective it was brought up right away that there are objections specifically to applying the word "transcendental" to Bresson's filmmaking. In his reply Rosenbaum offers evidence that Bresson wasn't always all that "Bressonian" himself!
    "Just as Freud couldn’t always be blamed for the Freudians, Bresson didn’t always feel obliged to behave like a Bressonian."
    Now that I read that the novel is quite different it becomes a bit more inexplicable anyway. Taïa obviously intended it to be very different from his book and has said so in interviews, but he hasn't said why he wanted it so different and what he intended by this style departing from the warmth of the book, even to making the boy's sexual encounters in Casablanca seem passive and joyless whereas in the book he has a good time.

    It would be interesting to know if Taïa had Bresson in mind at all. Not that it matters. It's a rather weird film. Rather fragmentary. I didn't dislike it but I didn't love it. It deserves a lot of credit for bravery in shooting such a theme and story (mostly) in Morocco. Taïa has said the Arab Spring should make it more possible to do such work. Not that gayness isn't condoned in certain contexts routinely in Morocco as SALVATION ARMY itself shows, but making a film about it is another story. One could substitute "austere and brave" for "Bressonian" with no loss.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    16,055
    Ricahard Ayoade's THE DOUBLE comes out Friday, May 9, 2014.

    The Filmleaf review of it is here.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •