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Thread: CLINT EASTWOOD'S THE UNFORGIVEN new restoration

  1. #1
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    CLINT EASTWOOD'S "UNFORGIVEN" in q new restoration

    25th Anniversary 4K restoration of Eastwood's Unforgiven coming this week.



    News is out of the new 4K restoration of Clint Eastwood’s 1992 Oscar-winner (Best Picture, Best Director, Best Supporting Actor for Gene Hackman, and Best Film Editing), starring Eastwood, Morgan Freeman, Hackman, and Richard Harris (screenplay by Blade Runner, Ladyhawke and 12 Monkeys co-writer David Webb Peoples). DCP. It opens at Film Forum in New York in a "25th Anniversary Restoration" Friday, August 4 – Thursday, August 10, 2017.

    Even if you can't be at Film Forum, watch the film and join a celebration and reassessment. It's available on HBO. Or get yourself a copy of it in Blu-ray or DVD.

    At 62, Eastwood plays a beat up gunslinger at the tail end of the Wild West days, who has become an unsuccessful hog farmer and has two little kids he's raising alone. His Christian wife Claudia, who coaxed him into giving up alcohol and violence a decade before, has died. He leaves his kids and his hogs on their own for a couple weeks to raise money by slaying bad men who brutally beat and slashed a prostitute. Along the way he meets up with a nearsighted young would-be gunslinger with the made-up name "The Schofield Kid" (Jaimz Woolvett in a feature debut), an old partner (Morgan Freeman), and a badman turned sadistic sheriff (Gene Hackman), as well as a grandiose Englishman (Richard Harris) and the irate whores who put up the reward.

    Most of these male stars are still around (not Harris) and are worth in excess of $50 million each; Hackman is worth over three times that. Eastwood has continued to direct and sometimes star in movies and has recently "I want to make movies till I'm 105." TUnforgiven was 25 years ago, but it is still one of his great milestones, perhaps his greatest. IT is signed "to Dan and Sergio", a homage to his mentors, SErgio Leone and Don Siegel, who has died three years ago and one year ago, respectively.

    See Roger Ebert's enlightening description and summary of the film, which he calls an "elegy" for the Western that "reflects a passing era even in its visual style" and "works itself out in classic Western terms" and "The screenwriter, David Webb Peoples, ignores the recent tradition in which the expensive star dominates every scene, and creates a rich gallery of supporting roles," in which we observe "Eastwood as the master of the kind of sustained action sequence he learned from Leone and Siegel: Not a boring montage of quick cuts and meaningless violence, but a story told through deliberate strategy, in which events may not be possible, but are somehow plausible. "

    Jonathan Rosenbaum: "As a moral reconsideration of the role of violence in previous Eastwood films, this is strong and sure, and characters who play against genre expectations give the film a provocative, smoldering aftertaste. The only limitation, really, is that the picture hasn’t much dramatic urgency apart from its revisionist context."
    Last edited by Chris Knipp; 08-02-2017 at 04:06 PM.

  2. #2
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    UNFORGIVEN is one of J. Hobeman's picks for August on NYR See them HERE.

    Selected by J. Hoberman
    August 4, 2017—August 31, 2017

    August Films: ‘Unforgiven,’ ‘Fox and His Friends,’ Boxing on Film, and more


    Unforgiven: As a filmmaker and personality, Clint Eastwood has been one of Hollywood’s most problematic creators but most people would agree that this 1992 Oscar winner, a movie he waited years to make (wanting to be the same age as its hired-killer protagonist), gave him his strongest role. Also his greatest movie—and maybe even the last truly great western that anyone will make. It’s showing at Film Forum in a new 4K digital restoration, August 4-10.

    ��

    Nocturama: French filmmaker Bertrand Bonello’s daring and controversial follow-up to his Yves Saint Laurent biopic is even more stylish—an abstract thriller predicated on two interlocked fantasies. A shabby-chic cadre of young Parisians orchestrate a series of terrorist attacks, then take refuge in an empty department store. Timely and timeless, the movie is only superficially shallow, as it sets the last two-hundred-odd years of French history to a hypnotic techno-trance beat. At the Metrograph and the Film Society of Lincoln Center, August 11-17.

    ��

    "Deeper into Nocturama": Following a run of Nocturama, the Film Society of Lincoln Center is presenting an eclectic series of films selected by Bonello as reference points: Howard Hawks’s Rio Bravo (1959) and its crypto-remake, John Carpenter’s Assault on Precinct 13 (1976); Abbas Kiarostami’s paradoxical documentary Close-up (1990); Robert Bresson’s The Devil, Probably (1977); Éric Rohmer’s Full Moon in Paris (1984); and David Cronenberg’s The Brood (1978). Gus Van Sant’s 2002 Elephant is conspicuously absent but David Lynch’s 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (in a new digital restoration), which Bonello calls “the most upsetting, the most terrifying, the most inventive and the most crazy of all of David Lynch’s films,” is not. August 18-24.

    ��

    "Boxing on Film: Part 1": Over the decades, the sweet science has lent itself to more (and better) films than any other sport. The first installment of this wide-ranging survey features John Huston’s first-rate Fat City, Martin Scorsese’s masterpiece Raging Bull, and Frederick Wiseman’s terrific Boxing Gym as well as a program of rarities that include a rediscovered newsreel of the Dada hero Arthur Craven in action. Anthology Film Archives, August 18-27.

    ��

    One of Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s first commercial hits, Fox and His Friends (1975) is also one of his most self-revealing movies—a sort of psychodrama in which the filmmaker plays an uneducated gay roustabout who wins the lottery and is consequently swindled and betrayed by his social betters. Newly restored, it’s getting a week-long run at BAMcinématek, August 25-31.

    Category: Film
    Various Locations
    [Image: Pascale Ogier in Full Moon in Paris]
    Last edited by Chris Knipp; 08-02-2017 at 06:08 PM.

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