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Thread: Toronto film festival 2017

  1. #16
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    D'Angelo enjoys the relative calm of the last two days of TFF 2017.
    I do miss my friends, but man oh man is TIFF more pleasant to navigate in its last few days, after ~80% of press/industry has gone home.
    Félicité (Gomis): 70. Was digging the Dardennes-ish desperate quest narrative, then the movie itself has a fascinating nervous breakdown.
    A rare dovetailing: Metacritic's rating of this Kinshasha-set film by Parisian-born Alain Gomis film also is 70%.
    He adds, though:
    It did frustrate me a bit by offering at least four potentially great endings and continuing beyond them. Kinda shrugged at actual ending.
    /Western/ (Grisebach): still 54. Understood more dialogue (e.g. "We're back! Only took 70 years"), but the arid, academic feel persisted.
    Plonger (Laurent): 42. Opens with a lengthy falling-in-love montage and never really exits shorthand mode thereafter. Disappointing.
    A film by French actress Mélanie Laurent (Breathe as a director, which D'Angelo loved; Inglourious Basterds and 40 credits as an actress including The Beat My Heart Skipped and Don't Worry, I'm Fine). Even the Imdb blurb of Plongersounds a bit lame: "A restless photographer leaves her family to "find herself" and takes up deep-sea diving."

    Last edited by Chris Knipp; 09-16-2017 at 03:47 PM.

  2. #17
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    Peter Bradshaw (from yesterday, Sept. 15).

    MANHUNT: review by Bradshaw of theGuardian – John Woo rolls back the years with big pharma bullet-barrage" - 4 OUT OF 5 STARS - "The godfather of balletic bloodshed is back to his pre-Hollywood best with this Japan-set action thriller about a lawyer on the run from his shady former boss." This could be an example of a movie that offers nothing but reassurance that a veteran filmmaker can still do what he used to do, even if it feels a bit out of date, and that can give any fan pleasure, I reckon. I'd watch it in a hertbeat.

    BREATHE: review – "Andrew Garfield fronts poignant biopic of wheelchair pioneer." - 3 OUT OF 5 STARS - "Andy Serkis’s directorial debut is a heartfelt retelling of the story of Robin Cavendish that highlights a vital chapter of history but airbrushes another." This might evoke comparisons with Theory of Everything about Stephen Hawking starring Eddie Redmayne: it concerns a real person who was a dashing fellow who brokered tea in Kenya with a beautiful wife, then when struck down with polio was the first to use a wheelchair equipped with a respirator, instead of those "iron lung" things. Is Andrew Garfield only going to play saintly characters now? It's also motion-capture pioneer Serkis's directorial debut, but a very traditional effort, no experimentation. This feels like a chore to watch: too much nobility and goodness. What Bradshaw thinks was "airbrushed" is the brutality of British treatment of Mau Mau prisoners. As a dutiful fan of both Andys, I feel obligated to watch this, but not eager.

    DARK RIVER: Guardian review (Bradshaw)- "Sparkling central duo lift Clio Barnard's social-realist farm yarn" - 3 OUT OF 5 STARS - "The Arbor and Selfish Giant director coaxes magnetic performances from Ruth Wilson and Mark Stanley in this tale of sibling resentment on a Yorkshire farm." - "Clio Barnard is the fiercely intelligent, visually inventive and innovative film-maker who gave us the brilliant docu-hybrid The Arbor and then The Selfish Giant, an inspired interpretation of Oscar Wilde set in Bradford. Her third feature, Dark River, is never anything other than acute and sensitive, with some very good actors giving well directed performances. But for all this movie’s qualities, it is a British social-realist picture in a well-understood idiom which perhaps doesn’t quite give us the shock of the new that her previous films delivered." Sounds like a letdown. Barnard's The Arbor (SFIFF 2011 - my review) was impressive, and I was drawn in and moved by The Selfish Giant (IFC Center - Filmleaf review). Maybe Bradshaw missed something here: Guy Lodge of Variety calls this film " A severe, stoic but internally screaming third feature."


    Last edited by Chris Knipp; 09-17-2017 at 09:36 PM.

  3. #18
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    Fabulous coverage-by-proxy, Chris!

    I dig Mike D'Angelo...he's a good man.
    "Set the controls for the heart of the Sun" - Pink Floyd

  4. #19
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    Thanks. He is a good man, D'Angelo and I don't know why he's not writing full coverage for Cannes or Toronto, apparently didn't even go to Cannes and won't be going to the NYFF. There will be some followup reviews on Letterbox'd, that's all, I guess.

  5. #20
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    More D'Angelo, staying (he says) to "the bitter end."
    Mademoiselle Paradis (Albert): 49. Can't decide whether to be about Paradis, about Mesmer (by way of Oliver Sacks), or about class.
    ...
    Not that it couldn't theoretically be about all of those things at once, but in practice it just kinda lurches around among them.
    Redoubtable (Hazanavicius): 40. More tepid than painful, though I winced at almost every cutesy allusion to Godard's own films.
    ...
    Also, this is the most I've ever liked Louis Garrel. You can't auto-brood as Godard.
    Radiance (Kawase): 39. This movie is Kawase's Twitter feed (or at least the stuff that @GuyLodge RTs) in ostensibly cinematic form.
    Ending TIFF '17 with Fatih Akin's IN THE FADE. Though I wonder: Is it better to W/O than to FADE away?
    Last edited by Chris Knipp; 09-17-2017 at 09:36 PM.

  6. #21
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    This is D'Angelo's last TFF '17 tweet review:
    In the Fade (Akin): 48. "Nazis. I hate these guys."



    In the FAde actually debuted at Cannes with a thriller comeback that may be more fun and watchable than D'Angelo's rating implies - or not. "- ‘In the Fade’ (‘Aus dem Nichts’): Film Review. ... Diane Kruger and Numan Acar in 'In the Fade.' ... Diane Kruger stars in Fatih Akin’s German-language courtroom and revenge drama about a deadly neo-Nazi hate crime." - Hollywood Reporter. (Deborah Young) Variety (Jay Weissberg): "First off: Fatih Akin’s 'The Cut' was an aberration, as we all suspected. The director celebrated for his edgy takes on intriguing characters more or less returns with 'In the Fade,' a well-constructed, at times moving story of a Hamburg woman seeking justice after the murder of her Kurdish husband and son by a couple of Neo-Nazis. 'More or less' because the excellent first quarter gives way to a relatively standard-issue though handsomely produced legal drama with several stock characters and a script that feels too guided by the presumed requirements of mainstream cinema. Diane Kruger’s powerhouse performance in her first German-language production goes a long way toward compensating for the narrative’s dip into overly crystalline waters..."


    Last edited by Chris Knipp; 09-18-2017 at 06:13 AM.

  7. #22
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    D'Angelo's faves.

    Mike D'Angelo‏Verified account @gemko 54m54 minutes ago
    More
    And now my TIFF is ended.

    Great: mother!, The Florida Project

    Near-great: Brawl in Cell Block 99

    👍🏻: Lean On Pete, Félicité, PROTOTYPE

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