Page 10 of 10 FirstFirst ... 8910
Results 136 to 144 of 144

Thread: The Longest Post On Filmwurld

  1. #136
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    1,552
    When I attended film school in the 1970's, they placed a large emphasis on European directors (Fellini, Bergman, Godard, Renoir, Lean, etc), some Japanese directors (Kurosawa), and very few American directors. It wasn't until I started to attend revival movie theaters in the late 70's when I lived in Los Angeles that I began to read about and discover William Wyler. He was still alive at the time and they had several retro's of his work in local theaters. Billy Wilder spoke at one of them. You can't appreciate a film unless you see 35mm film projected on a screen with an audience. The New York film critics raved about Wilder, Preston Sturges, Scorsese, and Hitch (pointing more toward the English side of his work, right around the same time Spoto published his first work). They mentioned Welles, too. They said very little about John Ford and downplayed his work as mostly "westerns." But when I started to speak with actors about Wyler, I got an entirely different response. They spoke of a man obsessed with realism; hence the reason for numerous takes. If an actor didn't convince Willie it was real, he made them do it again. He said, "I'll know it when I feel it." No wonder actors wanted him to make their movies. His films placed more actors in AA nominations than any director in film history. The more I read about Wyler, the more I found his life and his film work fascinating. Like most directors, he had his list of "bad" or unsuccessful films due to one aspect or another. Overall, he produced an incredible body of work I've found quite wonderful to review as my film library has many Wyler films in its pantheon.
    Colige suspectos semper habitos

  2. #137
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    4,669
    I think that every film school had unique tendencies depending on who was in charge and who he hired to teach. Some schools emphasized Hollywood directors more than the one you attended (I base this comment on the European slant you remember at your school). Andrew Sarris' 1968 book "The American Cinema" was a major influence on how different directors were regarded.

    As far as Wyler and realism, he is associated with a technique considered realistic because it replicates characteristics of human vision: deep-focus cinematography (Shots with a large depth of field). The DP most associated with deep-focus in Hollywood was, as you know, Greg Toland. He lensed 6 films for Wyler. It's interesting to note that after Toland died, Wyler's films continue to use the same technique consistently (see "The Heiress", "Carrie", etc.), no matter who was the DP. So that, I think, it's fair to associate this realistic rendering of the space in front of the camera as being also characteristic of Wyler. It's the most important aspect of the realistic aesthetic you rightfully ascribe to Wyler.
    Last edited by oscar jubis; 08-06-2019 at 08:31 PM.

  3. #138
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    13,290
    Nice to hear from you, Cinemabon.
    I hope you're cruising the daytime lines too and perused some of the festival coverage.

  4. #139
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    4,669
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Knipp View Post
    Nice to hear from you, Cinemabon.
    I hope you're cruising the daytime lines too and perused some of the festival coverage.
    I want to state (or re-state) how important it is the coverage of film festivals, new releases, and other events related to the culture of cinema that you provide in your reportage and film criticism. I don't really read anything else about these events/contempo films. I don't feel I need to resort to other sources given your excellence and thoroughness. As you know, most of my reading revolves around the courses I teach and the history of the medium and that consumes most of my available time. I love your NYFF coverage and I look forward to new films from Serra, Desplechin, Dardennes, and other favorite filmmakers. Thanks!

  5. #140
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    4,669
    THERE ARE NOW 7 FILMS DIRECTED BY KENJI MIZOGUCHI IN MY LIST OF FAVORITE FILMS OF ALL TIME. IT IS
    THE CRUCIFIED LOVERS (1954)
    which has been released by Criterion under the title A STORY FROM CHIKAMATSU
    Period melodrama at its finest!
    Dave Kehr says it's got the most experimental soundtrack of all his films.

  6. #141
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    13,290
    I have not seen it but I am aware that Criterion is issuing some great Japanese film classics.

  7. #142
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    1,552
    Ditto Oscar's comments. I "keep up" with contemporary cinema thanks in most, if not all, part to you Chris. I read your posts often and marvel at the depth of your insights. I wish more film critics were as easy to read and understand as you are. I'm not here to bolster your ego. I'm just writing what I consider to be observations. As a journalist, I've always sought clarity to reporting. However, my background doesn't have the breadth of psychological insights your reviews reveal in so many aspects. If I haven't said this before, I'm saying it now, you should have written for a major publication so that the public (at large) could benefit from your effort as we do here. Thanks, Chris, for years of film viewing dedication, intrinsic vision, and insightful journalism.
    Colige suspectos semper habitos

  8. #143
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    13,290
    Thanks a lot. It's nice to be appreciated. I don't know about "psychological insights." I do like to be clear and informative and I may, at times, succeed. Just go on reading, please, and comment whenever you can.

  9. #144
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    4,669
    THE 2010s

    It's the end of a decade; a time when different groups and publications poll people involved in film culture and production about the films they consider best or favorite of the decade as a whole or even the current 20 years of this millennium. It's a time to take stock on what matters most and which are the films that amount to the greatest current achievements in cinema. I am also interested in the biographical aspect of considering the films that made the most difference in the lives of people. In my case, it is easy to keep track of the films that had the most significance by updating and revising my list of favorite/best of all times that I published as the opening post about 15 years ago. You can see the 20 or 25 films released since 2010 that I've listed and have a clear idea what has made the biggest impact. Another interesting aspect of thinking about the decade that ends is how my viewing process and my decisions about what to watch have evolved. One change is that I watch less films than I used to, but the ones I like a lot I watch more often. I explore this compulsion to re-watch certain films; what that says about each film and what that says about me (and what maters to me).

    It's important to take stock from time to time of the essential elements of the medium and what the medium does best and which are the stories that matter most to tell at this time in human civilization. I look forward to ht lists that will be coming out soon, and the thoughts that provoke the choices made by different individuals as to the best of the decade in audiovisual art. One thing about this century that poses problems is that in the past 20 years or so, some of the best cinema may be produced for televisual broadcast or for streaming exhibitions rather than theatrical exhibition. (How many watched MUDBOUND in a cinema , for example? How many have failed to watch it because the never heard about it?)

    2010. GREENBERG (Baumbach/USA)
    ------MYSTERIES OF LISBON (Ruiz/Portugal)
    ------NOSTALGIA FOR THE LIGHT (Guzman/Chile)
    ------THE STRANGE CASE OF ANGELICA (Oliveira/Portugal)
    2011. A SEPARATION (Farhadi/Iran)
    ------THE ARBOR (Clio Barnard/UK)
    ------THE TREE OF LIFE (Malick/USA)
    ------THE TURIN HORSE (Tarr/Hungary)
    2012-HERE AND THERE (Mendez Esparza/Mexico)
    2013-PARADISE:LOVE/FAITH/HOPE (Seidl/Austria)
    2014-GOODBYE TO LANGUAGE (Godard/France-Switzerland)
    -----MR. TURNER (Leigh/UK)
    2015-BROOKLYN (John Crowley/Ireland)
    -----45 YEARS (Haigh/UK)
    -----HEART OF A DOG (Anderson/USA)
    -----SON OF SAUL (Nemes/Poland)
    2016-THE DEATH OF LOUIS XIV (Serra/Spain)
    -----PATERSON (Jarmusch/USA)
    2017- THE BIG SICK (Showalter/USA)
    -----MUDBOUND (Rees/USA)
    2018- THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND (Welles/Kodar/USA)
    ----- ZAMA (Martel/Argentina)
    Last edited by oscar jubis; 11-09-2019 at 06:26 PM. Reason: I accidentally omitted Tarr's THE TURIN HORSE.

Page 10 of 10 FirstFirst ... 8910

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •