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Thread: The Longest Post On Filmwurld

  1. #61
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    Glad you like Lachman.
    I have made a list of possible 2015 bests. You will find it if you look. It's a long thread. I have never gotten around to narrowing it down. I may yet. Or not. Carol and Son of Saul are at the top of mine though. I am not aware that Tsai had a new film out here last year. Or Alonso. Anyway is saw Jauja in 2014 but I guess it did get a theatrical release of sorts in the US in 2015. As usual with you, I wholeheartedly agree on some of your choices. I am not an auteurist -- except for my very few pet filmmakers :-)

  2. #62
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    I am going to re-watch Jauja tomorrow with a friend. Let's see how it holds up.

    I taught the Czech New Wave today.I have 4 films from this movement on my fave list and I just rewatched them:
    THE SHOP ON MAIN STREET (Kadar)
    CLOSELY WATCHED TRAINS (Menzel)
    MARKETA LAZAROVA (Vlacil)
    THE JOKE (Jires)
    As much as I admire Marketa Lazarova, I must admit I got tired about an hour into it and was not compelled to keep watching. This is a must-see film by all means but I find it occasionally plodding or ponderous and films on this list are not supposed to feel like that to me.

    I'm watching Mississippi Grind soon, from the directors of my beloved Half Nelson.

  3. #63
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    You could have knocked me over with a feather when I saw "Oscar Jubis has replied to your post..." in my email box. I thought you died.

    And speaking of the dead, since Lori and I moved to Greensboro, I feel as if I've fallen further off the cultural map (although they have a local cinema that shows movies on CURVED screens, which is very retro and very cool to see). Glad you are alive and teaching and going to the cinema. I read Chris about once a week or so to see what's on the horizon for the coming year, as he has his pulse on what's current and what's recommended.

    I post mostly on Facebook with other old timers. We talk about movies between 1930 to 1970 period - very nostalgic. The last movie I saw was "Brooklyn" (any good) as part of our - try to see as many nominees before the Oscars marathon. Lately, we did go to trash like "London has Fallen" and "Allegiant" but they aren't worth writing about and posting a review. As least the theaters are good (BIG screens, great sound systems, comfortable seating). They're all digital. No 70mm anamorphic here.

    Lori asked me if I wanted to see a movie in Chicago (in two weeks). I told her, "No way!" I'd rather go to Eataly, take our granddaughter to Shedd and Legoland. The movies will have to wait. Take care.
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  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by cinemabon View Post
    You could have knocked me over with a feather when I saw "Oscar Jubis has replied to your post..." in my email box. I thought you died.
    I didn't die but I was well on my way after 4 decades of smoking. I quit 10 months ago and I participate in a smoking cessation forum. I feel better. I manage an art cinema and I probably watch no more new movies than you do (lol). I did finally manage to make a list this year of titles I liked. I am very busy now because I'm teaching four courses so I'm paying attention to the (old) movies I teach, but usually catch up with new releases in May and June. I will watch Brooklyn then and I'll tell you if I liked it. It's incredibly that we've been posting in this forum for a dozen years!

  5. #65
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    Oscar, I thought you competed in road races. Your name is listed for a 10K. but that was 15 years ago. No, there's a marathon in Miami in 2009, maybe one more recent. So, a long distance runner who also smoked for "4 decades"?

    Cinnemabon, when did you move?
    Last edited by Chris Knipp; 03-25-2016 at 11:33 PM.

  6. #66
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    We moved last year on my birthday (I'm a Yankee Doodle Dandy... that one). I'm getting up there and this place has lots of stuff within one mile (though they could use some good bike paths). Then North Carolina goes Republican on us (WHAT?). I feel like we're slipping back in time (culturally). My son is attending college up the road (UNC system) and Lori is working in Chapel Hill on the UNC campus (a liberal island in a sea of red). I'm with a writer's group. We meet every other Tuesday and authors read their works. I read from my latest work, The Black Sphere, last Tuesday. We had a good turn out - a producer of local movies was there, along with a guy who's in SAG. Another worked with Robert Altman on several pictures. They're in IMDB. We've also some members who are into editing and publication. I cling to them for my sanity.

    They've got a very cool (note the hipster terms) restaurant/movie theater where you touch a button and a waiter will bring you anything you want. The chairs are big leather lounge chairs with tray tables, reserved seats and get this... CURVED SCREENS! The place is a hoot. They have eight theaters like that attached to an airplane hanger that has 18 cinemas! The caramel cheesecake was excellent. It's called the Four Seasons Movie Tavern. Get drunk and watch Jason Bourne.

    At 63, soon to be that other number, I'm beginning to slow a bit. Somethings always reaching out to touch me with a new ache or pain. Any devils out there? Yeah, I'd sell my soul for youth again but then about making those same mistakes... well, let's chalk it up to fait accompli. If it wasn't for the incredible mind of Chris Knipp, this site would have faded long ago. I drop by once a week or so and read his intelligent insights on what's new. I've always thought he should have written for the Hollywood Reporter, Variety, The Village Voice or the New Yorker. He's that good.

    Glad you're ok. I still love cinema. I love the artform. I love you guys. Take care.
    Last edited by cinemabon; 03-27-2016 at 01:19 AM.
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  7. #67
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    I just can't understand your saying you're "getting up there" when you only mean 63 to 64! It sounds like plenty of nice things are close at hand where you are, including the posh cinemas and Chapel Hill and film people at your reading your work -- except for the right wing takeover. But that means where you are reflects the way of things to dome, doesn't it? Might as well live in the eye of the storm. I admit I live between NYC and Berkeley, which is the opposite. Please come back to contributing. You're not too old for that. You have presented great series on musical movies, on David Lean, on your own personal film school and film work history that are invaluable and that needs to go on coming. Please, I'm much older than you are. It's all in your mind.

  8. #68
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    Hola amigos,
    Yes, I managed to finish two marathons and run competitive times in shorter races from about '88 to '04 even though I've smoked consistently since age 14 until 10 months ago. Being able to run is one thing that helped me make excuses about my smoking; now my health is seriously compromised (but I don't want to know, or talk about it). I am trying to exercise regularly but I lack discipline. I continue to happily live in Miami but I've considered moving if I'm offered a great job (which becomes increasingly unlikely with each passing year). I am still single (divorced in 2010) and plan to try online dating soon to see what happens.
    The last two films I watched are Creed (good) and Mississippi Grind (very good).
    We showed Aferim! at the Cosford this weekend but I didn't feel like watching it. Go figure.
    Oscar
    Last edited by oscar jubis; 03-28-2016 at 08:55 AM.

  9. #69
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    Hello again,
    It's great fun to re-watch movies that have impressed me tremendously in the past and put them to the test all over again. The question is whether any film will sustain its impact on me. In the latest update, I have added GROUNDHOG DAY a movie that seems to me like a result of magic or divine intervention because there is nothing in the pedigree of the writer or director that would make anyone expect something so monumentally profound. This movie has inspired a great deal of academic philosophizing as found in many journal essays in the fields of philosophy, psychology, religion, literature, cultural studies, etc. I think it's the rare comedy that measures up to the Golden Age great comedies directed by legends like Sturges and Lubitsch. On a negative note, I had great difficulty watching the cinematographically brilliant RAGING BULL but find its scope and worldview too narrow for my taste. Scorsese's drug-fueled depression and his rote professionalism are palpable. I also added Billy Wilder's last masterpiece AVANTI!(1972)with Jack Lemmon and Juliet Mills.
    Films I watched recently that I liked a lot include Xavier Nolan's MUMMY which uses different aspect ratios in meaningful ways and may appear too long at first, relative to its aims, and proves to deserve the longish running time.
    My favorite films I've seen this year are HEART OF A DOG and SUNSET SONG. The best foreign language movie I watched is the big Cannes winner from last year: DHEEPAN.

  10. #70
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    In studying time travel for one of my novels, I looked into the Mobius Strip, which represents a mathematical paradox. The question I've heard arise with "Groundhog Day" is that the story literally goes on for years in Murray's life and that we see only the highlights of that endless trip; living the same day over and over - a Dante's Inferno of sorts, a descent into hell. Ramis made several excellent comedies with Bill. However, the one that ironically plays best in my mind - and bears up with repeated viewings - is Groundhog Day. Perhaps it's the number of situations that build each time they're repeated or Murray's mundane throwaway delivery, especially in the diner when he tells Andie about every person there with a little too much personal detail. Ramis sense of humor is both dark and brooding in how Murray - terrified of this repeated existence - tries to end the loop with a series of suicides, each one topping the next. Perhaps that is the dark side of humanity as well; that we laugh each time he tried to end his life in ever more imaginative ways. That he should redeem his life by earning "the love of a good woman" is a little too contrite for its resolution. If that is salvation, think how lucky we married men are... I'll let you finish that sentence... sentence. Is that a pun?
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  11. #71
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    The point of Groundhog Day is, as I see it of course, that a jaded, cynical meteorologist learns to be a better person when he is forced by mysterious forces (the gods of cinema!) to relive one day. We see scenes from many repetitions of this day in the movie but certainly less than a year worth of days. The experience is ultimately the opposite of a descent into anything but more like an exaltation (and thus a defense in the face of wearied skepticism) of humanity's capacity to change for the better.
    Last edited by oscar jubis; 06-28-2016 at 07:36 PM.

  12. #72
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    Wikipedia:
    Time loop duration speculations[edit]
    Estimates regarding how long Phil remains trapped in the loop, in real time, vary widely. During filming, Ramis, who was a Buddhist, observed that according to Buddhist doctrine, it takes 10,000 years for a soul to evolve to its next level. Therefore, he said, in a spiritual sense, the entire arc of Groundhog Day spans 10,000 years.[4] In the DVD commentary, Ramis estimated a real-time duration of 10 years. Later, after several on-line sites arrived at a total of eight years, eight months, and 16 days, Ramis told a reporter, "I think the 10-year estimate is too short. It takes at least 10 years to get good at anything, and allotting for the down time and misguided years he spent, it had to be more like 30 or 40 years."[5] In 2014, the website WhatCulture tallied various time duration assumptions and estimated that Phil spent a total of 12,395 daysójust under 34 yearsóreliving Groundhog Day.[6]

  13. #73
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    I consider what is actually shown, about 38 days approximately, not speculation. I think it's a bit odd to include in the calculation, as some do, estimates of how the many years it would have taken anyone to learn to become an expert in ice sculpture.

  14. #74
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    Sculpture, yes... I'm thinking of mastering the piano to the point you can perform improvisation. Remember he also commands the ability to diagnose disease processes. We're not talking days for that to happen. Plus, think of all the disillusionment he experienced before he decided to attempt at making a positive experience. The final day hints at years of study, years of practice, years of making art before he could instantly create a perfect face out of ice in a matter of minutes. Redeemed, he passes to the next level on his way to Nirvana.
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  15. #75
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    2010 THE ARBOR (Clio Barnard)
    After repeat viewings,The Arbor has now achieved canonical status. It is described on IMdb in this order: "documentary, biography, drama". Ms. Barnard received an award for "best documentary filmmaker" at Tribeca in 2010 but most scenes in the film use actors and other scenes are excerpted from adaptations of fictional, albeit partly autobiographical, material written by Andrea Dunbar (1961-1990). The most arresting scenes include actors lip-synching to the actual voices of Dunbar's daughters and other relatives. The effect is uncanny and revelatory. This eminently self-conscious film provides fresh perspectives on the so-called kitchen-sink realism and provides insight into the complex relationship between representation and documentation. Ms. Barnard's second film, The Selfish Giant is entirely fictional.

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